Risk querying

Sometimes, in calculations, we need to perform some complex operations, such as making decisions by looking into all child risks, returning the sum of bodilyInjury premium across all child risks, or finding out how many child risks exist for a given risk.

In BriteCore, you can query risks in many different ways.

bc.risk

The rater provides bc.risk utility, which can be used to query information from either the risk currently being rated or all of its child risks.

bc.risk.number

Returns the risk number and can be used to identify whether it’s a first risk, second risk, third risk, and so on.

bc.risk.number

bc.risk.term_premium

Returns the term premium from current risk.

bc.risk.term_premium

bc.risk.pro_rata_premium

Returns the pro-rata premium from current risk.

bc.risk.pro_rata_premium

bc.risk.get({lookup}, {default: optional})

Query information from the current risk. An optional default value can be provided, which, by default, returns None when the query isn’t resolved.

bc.risk.get('fields.someField')

Returns the value of someField but returns None if the query isn’t resolved.

bc.risk.{descendants-risks}

This is the most powerful feature of risk querying, giving you access to perform aggregated operations on descendants risks.

bc.risk.descendants({depth})

Returns specific descendants risks of provided depth, which is a number that tells BriteCore to grab risks from only that particular level.

Example:

Risk Type hierarchy:

- Policy
  - Vehicle
    - Driver
      - Violation

Querying at the policy level based on the hierarchy above:

bc.risk.descendants(1)  # Returns risks at first level so only `Vehicle` risks will be returned
bc.risk.descendants(2)  # Returns risks at second level so only `Driver` risks will be returned
bc.risk.descendants(3)  # Returns risks at third level so only `Violation` risks will be returned

bc.risk.descendants_up_to({depth})

Returns descendants risks up to provided depth, which is a number that tells BriteCore to grab risks up to only that particular level.

Example:

Risk Type hierarchy:

- Policy
  - Vehicle
    - Driver
      - Violation

Querying at the policy level based on the hierarchy above:

bc.risk.descendants_up_to(1)  # Returns risks up to first level so only `Vehicle` risks will be returned
bc.risk.descendants_up_to(2)  # Returns risks up to second level so `Vehicle` and `Driver` risks will be returned
bc.risk.descendants_up_to(3)  # Returns risks up to third level so `Vehicle`, `Driver` and `Violation` risks will be returned

bc.risk.all_descendants

Returns all descendants risks.

Example:

Risk Type hierarchy:

- Policy
  - Vehicle
    - Driver
      - Violation

Querying at the policy level based on the hierarchy above:

bc.risk.all_descendants

Note: The query above will return all descendants risks: VehicleDriver and Violation.

bc.risk.children

Convenience method to get specific descendants risks of the first level, which is similar to bc.risk.descendants(1).

bc.risk.grandchildren

Convenience method to get specific descendants risks of the second level, which is similar to bc.risk.descendants(2).

bc.risk.great_grandchildren

Convenience method to get specific descendants risks of the third level, which is similar to bc.risk.descendants(3).

Aggregated Operations

Aggregated operations can be performed on descendants risks.

All of the examples hereon can be used with the following:

  • bc.risk.descendants({depth})
  • bc.risk.descendants_up_to({depth})
  • bc.risk.all_descendants
  • bc.risk.children
  • bc.risk.grandchildren
  • bc.risk.great_grandchildren

Note: This isn’t limited to bc.risk.children. For simplicity, we will use only bc.risk.children for aggregation in examples hereon.

Lookups

The aggregated operations are based on a lookup expression used to define which field to aggregate.

Supported lookups

The example aggregation operation is sum, and it can be any supported aggregation operation defined in the following subsections.

  • bc.items
    bc.risk.children.sum(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)
  • bc.fields
    bc.risk.children.sum(bc.fields.some_field)
  • bc.premium
    bc.risk.children.sum(bc.premium.term.value)
  • bc.calculations
    bc.risk.children.sum(bc.calculations.some_calculation)
  • bc.rate_tables
    bc.risk.children.sum(bc.rate_tables.some_rate_table)

bc.risk.children.min({lookup})

Returns the minimum value from all child risks for a given lookup.

bc.risk.children.min(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child risks. So, if bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 1) resolved to 1.0 and bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 2) resolved to 2.0, then it will return 1.0.

Note: If there aren’t any child risks or the query isn’t resolved, then min will return None.

bc.risk.children.max({lookup})

Returns the maximum value from all child risks for a given lookup.

bc.risk.children.max(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child risks. So, if bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 1) resolved to 1.0 and bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 2) resolved to 2.0, then it will return 2.0.

Note: If there aren’t any child risks or the query isn’t resolved, then max will return None.

bc.risk.children.sum({lookup})

Returns the sum of all resolved values from all child risks for a given lookup.

bc.risk.children.sum(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child risks. So, if bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 1) resolved to 1.0 and bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 2) resolved to 2.0, then it will return 3.0.

bc.risk.children.avg({lookup})

Returns the average of all resolved values from all child risks for a given lookup.

bc.risk.children.avg(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child risks. So, if bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 1) resolved to 100.0 and bodilyInjury.premium.term.value (child risk 2) resolved to 300.0, then it will return 200.0.

bc.risk.children.count({lookup: optional})

Returns the count of all child risks. Optionally, you can pass lookup, which checks its existence.

bc.risk.children.count()

If a risk has two sub-child risks, then the answer will be 2.

bc.risk.children.count(bc.items.bodilyInjury)

If a risk has two sub-child risks but only one of them has bodilyInjury, then the answer will be 1.

bc.risk.children.exists({lookup})

If the provided lookup successfully resolved in any child risks, then it returns True or False.

bc.risk.children.exists(bc.items.bodilyInjury)

If any of the child risks has bodilyInjury coverage enabled, then it returns True; otherwise, it will return False.

bc.risk.children.get({lookup}, {default: optional})

Returns the value of a given lookup.

Note: This operation should be accessed only after filtering all child risks to the point only one risk is found.

If there are multiple risks that meet the criteria, this operation will fail. You can provide an optional default value, which, by default, returns None if the query isn’t resolved.

bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='drivers').get(bc.fields.goodStudent)

The above returns the value of the goodStudent field for the drivers risk type, but if the query isn’t resolved, it returns None.

Children operations

bc.risk.children.order_by({lookup1}, {lookup2}, …)

Sorts the child risks based on fields defined by one or more lookups. By default, the results are sorted in ascending order.

Note: To sort the results in descending order, add the - sign to the corresponding lookup as a prefix.

bc.risk.children.order_by(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the child risks and orders them by their bodilyInjury coverage term premium, starting with the smallest.

bc.risk.children.order_by(-bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Returns the child risks and orders them by their bodilyInjury coverage term premium, starting with the largest.

bc.risk.children.order_by(-bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value, bc.calculations.driverFactor)

Returns the child risks:

  • First, in descending order by their bodilyInjury coverage term premium.
  • Next, in ascending order by their driverFactor.

bc.risk.children.limit({count})

Return a subset of the child risks, which is limited to the number defined by count.

bc.risk.children.limit(2)

Returns only the first two child risks. If the original set is empty, an empty set is returned. If the original set contains only one child, then this child is returned.

bc.risk.children.get_values({lookup})

Finds value for a given lookup in all child risk states.

bc.risk.children.get_values(bc.fields.name)

Returns a list with the value of the name field for all the child risks. If a child doesn’t have the name field, nothing is added to the list for that child.

Filtering

To filter before calling on aggregated operations:

bc.risk.children.filter(*args, **kwargs)This filters child risks using the provided lookup parameters. Lookup parameters can be passed as:

  1. Keyword filtering: Keyword arguments of the fields__lookuptype=value type where lookuptype specifies the filtering operation.
    bc.risk.children.filter(number__gt=2)
    

    The above filter will match all child risks where the number field is greater than 2.

    Each lookup is treated as a conditional clause. If multiple lookups are provided, then they are combined using the logical and operator.

    For nested fields, use a double underscore.

    bc.risk.children.filter(fields__mileage__lt=1000) -> will match all child risks where the mileage is less than 1000
    bc.risk.children.filter(calculations__driverFactor=2.0) -> will match all child risks where the driverFactor calculation is 2.0
    bc.risk.children.filter(rate_tables__bodilyInjuryBaseRateTable=100) -> will match all child risks where the bodilyInjuryBaseRateTable rate table is 100
    bc.risk.children.filter(items__bodilyInjury__premium__term__value=2.0) -> will match all child risks where the bodilyInjury item's term premium is 2.0
    
  2. Positional filtering: Positional arguments of the .filter(Q(...)) type, which can be used to build conditional clauses that need to be either combined using logical or or negated using not.
    bc.risk.children.filter(Q(number=1) | Q(number=2))
    

    The above query will filter only the child risk states where the number is either 1 or 2.

Supported lookup types

The following are supported lookup types:

  • exact exact equality (default)
  • neq inequality
  • contains containment
  • icontains insensitive containment
  • in membership
  • startswith string startswith
  • istartswith insensitive startswith
  • endswith string endswith
  • iendswith insensitive endswith
  • gt greater than
  • gte greater than or equal to
  • lt less than
  • lte less than or equal to
  • regex regular expression search
  • filter nested filter

Examples:

  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles').min(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value) – Returns minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child Vehicle risks.
  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name__in=['vehicles', 'trailers']).min(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value) – Returns minimum bodilyInjury premium across all child Vehicle or Trailer risks.
  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles').min(bc.calculations.driverFactor) – Returns the minimum driverFactor calculation result across all child Vehicle risks.
  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles').min(bc.rate_tables.propertyDamageLimitFactorTable) – Returns the minimum propertyDamageLimitFactorTable rate table result across all child Vehicle risks
  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles').filter(fields__mileage__gte=1000).avg(bc.fields.mileage) – Returns the average mileage across all Vehicle risks whose mileage is greater than or equal to 1000.
  • bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles').filter(~Q(fields__ratingTier__in=['ratingTier_standard', 'ratingTier_preferred']).count() – Returns the total count of all the Vehicle risks whose ratingTier is not Standard or Preferred.

Gotchas!

Be aware of the following gotchas:

  • Filtering should always come before aggregation operations (minmaxsum, or count).
  • Filtering shouldn’t yield 0 results when using on following aggregated operations minmax or sum.

Shorthand methods for filtering

The following is a shorthand method you can use as an alternative for bc.risk.children.filter(type__name='vehicles'):

bc.risk.{risk_type_name}

Usage:

bc.risk.vehicles.count()
bc.risk.vehicles.min(bc.items.bodilyInjury.premium.term.value)

Note: If no risks have been added to the quote for the referenced risk type, the min and max will return None.